What are Study Days?

In these exceptional times (Covid) we have changed the format of our Study Days.

For now, these will be run as a Zoom Webinar and will consist of two 45-minute lectures with time for questions and a coffee break of 15 and 30 mins between the two lectures.

The Study day will start at 10am and finishing around 12.30pm.

The cost will be £8 to be paid after the event.

Details on how to join the zoom meeting and how to pay for the event will be send out before each Study Day

The next Study Day: Tuesday 25 May 2021

Swedish Grace:  A hundred years of Swedish Art and Design

Lecturer is Anne Anderson.
With a first degree in archaeology and a PhD in English, Anne was a senior lecturer in Art and Design History at Southampton Solent University for 14 years. During 2009-2010, Anne worked on Closer to Home the reopening exhibition at Leighton House Museum, Kensington. She has curated three national exhibitions, including The Truth About Faeries (2009-11) and Under the Greenwood: Picturing the British Tree (2013). Her book on The Perseus Series was published for the Edward Burne-Jones exhibition (2018). She has held several prestigious fellowships including Fellow of the Huntington Library, CA (2008 and 2018) and Fellow of the Henry Francis DuPont Winterthur Library and Museum (2009/10). Currently a tutor for the V&A Learning Academy, Anne specialises in Art Nouveau and the Arts and Crafts movement. Her career as an international speaker has taken her all over the world, including Jersey, Spain, Germany, New Zealand, Canada and the USA. She undertook her fourth lecture tour of Australia, for ADFAS, in 2018.

Session 1 – Larsson and Zorn 
While Zorn could be compared to John Singer Sargent, with his bravado portraits in the grand manner, Larsson has acquired a wider fame as the founding father of IKEA. Larsson exemplifies Swedish Grace, a desire to live in simple but beautiful surroundings. He and his wife Karin, who bore eight children, created an idyllic home at Lilla Hyttnäs, in Sundborn, Dalarna. Through his paintings and books (A Home, Larssons, A Farm), Lilla Hyttnäs has become one of the most famous artist’s homes in the world, transmitting the artistic taste of its creators. After establishing his reputation as an international portrait painter Zorn, from Mora, Dalarna, returned to his native land to create Zorngården. Zorn’s studio-house expresses the architectural freedom of the day, drawing on the Arts and Crafts ethos and folk art traditions. Fearing the loss of these traditions Zorn created Gammelgården in the southern part of Mora, a collection of around 40 timber houses that he bought and moved to make sure that the old art of building such houses would not be forgotten

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carl Larsson (1853-1919) exemplifies Swedish Grace, a desire to live in simple but beautiful surroundings. He and his wife Karin, who bore eight children, created an idyllic home at Lilla Hyttnäs, in Sundborn, Dalarna. Through his paintings and books (A Home, Larssons, A Farm), Lilla Hyttnäs has become one of the most famous artist’s homes in the world. The artistic taste of its creators lives on and is most obviously seen today in IKEA.

Anders Zorn (1860-1920) is renowned as Sweden’s master painter and most famous artist. After establishing an international reputation as a portrait painter Zorn, from Mora, Dalarna, returned to his native land to create Zorngården. Zorn’s studio-house expresses the architectural freedom of the day, drawing on the Arts and Crafts ethos and folk art traditions.

Session 2 – Swedish Design

Rooted in the simple forms and clean lines of Neoclassism, Swedish style does not tolerate clutter.  In the 1920s Architect Erik Gunnar Asplund (1885-1940) was a key representative of Nordic Classicism.  Swedish Grace is also exemplified by Stockholm’s City Hall (Ragnar Östberg), as well as the pavilion created by Carl G. Bergstein for the Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels in 1925. The small pavilion was an Art Deco version of classicism, pure and simple. The engraved crystal and art glass of Orrefors, which suggests frozen liquid, took a prized gold medal.

Moving away from the Arts and Crafts ethos, the emphasis shifted to an alliance of art and industry. The modernist style made its breakthrough in Sweden at the Stockholm International Exhibition (1930). However thanks to Svenskt Tenn (founded 1924), a design store that can be compared to Liberty’s of Regent Street, Swedish Modern embraced bold contrasts in materials, colours and prints. Its lead designer Josef Frank was inspired by the patterns of William Morris.  Through designers like Frank, Swedish Modern avoided the harsh functionalism of the 1930s. Thanks to Svenskt Tenn, Swedish Grace continues to influence the contemporary home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Previous Study Days

To read about our previous study days click here

How do I contact the organisers?

Study Days are organised by Mark Gardiner and Julia Reece. If you would like any more general information, please email them at tasoxford@gmail.com